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20130318
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. neil smith is the head of cable. when steve burke moved over to nbc universal after 12 years of earning comcast cable and took us from two or 3 million customers to 20 and we became a cable company in 30 states, huge job. when neil got here, he wanted to make it work better, and it's all about improving service. although we are nowhere near where i would like us to be and where the definition of good service never ends, being able to self-help, get it right the first time, make it simpler -- i think we have made terrific strides. >> why do you think the cable industry seems to have had a reputation for not the best service at times? >> i think it's inherently unpopular to ask people to pay for television. or not,you like it where the ones collecting the bill. company,gle content sports company, entertainer, journalist gets a raise every year. we have to go back and raise rates every year. i thinkand successfully, to improve the value of what it is you receive , you get it high definition you can watch it on an ipad in your home, your watching it outside of your home. still notl of that,
. host: all right our last phone call. up next we will talk to congressman steve pearce about his outreach to minorities, women and young voters and then we will turn our attention to capitol hill with earl. we'll be right back. >> 34 years ago fay we began providing access to the kong and federal government. the c-span networks created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you as a public service by your cable providers. >> and we can take pictures with m.r.i. or upset scans or c.t. scans and see the whole thing but there's an enormous gap about how the circuits function in the brain as to how i am able to move my hand or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. with technology yet to be invented, so a lot of this is going to be technology invented or nano technology. but we need to be able to record hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time and be able to understand how it works. that's brain mas analysis that's at work. we don't really have work yet for milestones and that but it's getting to be a very exciting moment to put together thooth
on washington, d.c., congressman steve appears g.o.p.'s political strategy is discussed. at 8:30 eastern,
is available on- line at politico dot com. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> steve king and michele bachmann and former house speaker newt gingrich where among the speakers saturday at the conference. this is about one hour, 20 minutes. the to six years ago, national debt was not a big deal, and then a grass-roots movement, known as the tea party, began to emerge. [cheers and applause] and what made the tea party so effective is not only did it come from the grass roots, but it had three priorities, including fiscal responsibility, limited government, and free markets. because of the tea party, we were able to put candidates like michele bachmann into congress so they can make sure that congress will not continue to spend my generation's money. we need to save the tea party so that we can save america. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome a representative for the tea party patriots. ♪ coming up ♪ >> thank you. picture this. college students who are optimistic about this future and look forward to living the american dream. they becomege, parents and put food on the table for the
it nationally. for example, when a conservative like steve pearce in new mexico wins in a predominantly latino district, we need to glean the lessons of his approach. second, in order to combat misperceptions, we will premiere an aggressive marketing campaign across the country, especially in communities we haven't been to in a long time, about what it means to be a republican. third, we will establish regular focus groups and listening sessions, to ensure we are on target in our communications. we will regularly share our findings, as well as polling results, with our candidates, allies, state parties, and elected leaders. because it all goes back to what our moms used to tell us, it's not just what we say, it's how we say it. the promise of opportunity will be our message, and a spirit of optimism will infuse everything we do. messaging certainly overlaps with the next action area, demographic partners. now, i didn't need a report to tell me that we have to make up ground with minority groups, with women, and with young voters. specifically for youth voters, the report outlines the need to p
ahead, steve. of the back then, 85% public believed that we should go to war. .ecause of false pretenses it was the biggest mistake since the vietnam war. when you spend that much blood and treasure, now we're in the weakness. you have to choose your battles wisely. the war in iraq is the worst thing. it may mean not be a republican anymore, i can tell you that right now. you guys are awesome. i love this. years.not called in, in we've talked about the iraq war, -- are talking about [indiscernible] i draw the line in the sand. am the 15% that disagreed of ever going to war. i said at the europeans don't care, why should we care? .e spent our blood and treasure will go to chattanooga, tennessee, democratic caller. caller: thank you very much. i would like to say good morning, america. i am a proud vietnam veteran that served under general powell. he was one of the most honest and forthcoming commanders that i ever served under. he brought me back from vietnam in 1971. anyway, here is my point. the fact of the matter is, general colin powell came on the television after the war, after the
it make sense for dod to dissipate with one person over there? >> i would have to get back steve. what we have to assure there is the exchange of information and intelligence. >> thank you, mr. chairman. director mueller, thank you for the superb job you have been doing at the fbi. we spoke about using dna technology to solve serious crimes. there was a period when the crime lab had a backlog of offender dna samples. it was a lot of work but by investing technology, the fbi has cleared that backlog. the report from 2010 down there was a substantial f.b.i. dna casework back log. an update published in september found that that backlog is a very low and well managed. i want to commend you and your staff for bringing that up to date. i have no doubt that we are solving serious crimes and preventing additional people from being victimized. there are many state and local crime labs around the country that have not been as successful as the fbi and i hope that you and the fbi lab can prioritze sharing the lessons learned about clearing your backlog with the state and local governments. i wanted
to dissipate with one person over there? >> i would have to get back steve. to assure there is the exchange of information and intelligence. thank you, mr. chairman. director mueller, thank you for that sector -- the superb job you have been doing at the fbi. dnapoke about using technology to solve serious crimes. there was a period when the crime lab had a backlog of offender dna samples. it was a lot of work but by investing technology, the fbi has clear that backlog. the report from 2010 down there was a substantial f.b.i. dna -- casework back log. i want to commend you and your staff for bringing that up to date. there are many state and local crime labs around the country that have not been as successful as the fbi and i hope that you and the fbi lab compaore tis sharing the lessons he learned about clearing your backlog with the state and local governments. i wanted to touch on a familiar search which we talked about before. this is a message -- a method to determine if dna from a crime has a relationship to someone in the offender database. was of the best case gramm sleeper who murd
regarding an mm it to repeal -- an amendment to repeal the affordable care act. steve is calling us from indianapolis, democrat line. good morning. , there is so much waste in healthcare today. with the affordable health care act, i think that is one thing that is targeting is waste. one of my family's biggest expenses healthcare, and that is with insurance through my employer. thatis my biggest expense we have in our budget, so i think if they can target ways are you have lobbyists that lobbying hard for insurance companies, that ought to be an indication to all of us that this health care act is something we all need. host: michael in florida, on our line for republicans. caller: thanks for taking my call. host: your thoughts about the verbal care act. caller: i think it should be repealed. i think it is a disaster. the president lied about the cost of it. the people that are going to receive it don't care or know how it is going to be funded. i just think it is a total disaster, and they're going to destroy the best healthcare system in the industry. host: is there anything specifical
to the audience. if you have a question, please state your name and who you represent. do it.steve association for career and technical education. the skills gap is very connected to a lot of our courses. my question is about, on the education pipeline you mentioned certifications. you mentioned some students can start right out of high school, though probably most will have to have some post secondary. what iwe better connect call march additional academic education with this discussion -- more traditional academic education with this discussion? oftens and students choose a track based on perception, and there's not enough discussion discussion about how these to connect together and what the opportunity is for students. just wondering if you have thoughts about that. a sense of create value and excitement and understanding, again, around these careers. in large measure, it is there on the i.t. side. on the manufacturing side, people need to understanding, they are going to have a job paying $60,000 and they are 23, 24 years old and their debt is zero. instead of $80,000 in debt, they will h
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)